All Episodes

Ep. 65 – Bridget, Age 14: Handling a controlling friend

What’s behind a friend wanting to control you? Bridget wonders how to deal with a friend who is being controlling.

Ep. 65 – Bridget, Age 14: Handling a controlling friend

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 65 – Bridget, Age 14: Handling a controlling friend
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Think About it Questions
  • Have you ever had a controlling friend? If so, why do you think your friend was trying to control you? How did you handle it?
  • Has anyone ever told you that you were being bossy or controlling? If so, what happened? What are some signs that you might be pushing a friend too hard and need to stop?
  • Rigid thinkers tend to believe that there is “one right way” to do things. How could that hurt a friendship? (Hint: How might a friend feel if they want to do things differently?)
  • What does it mean to “agree to disagree”? Why is it sometimes good to do this in a friendship?

Ep. 64 – Blake, Age 13: Make friends with different interests

Building real connections to make friends Blake wants to know how to make friends with kids who have different interests than he does.

Ep. 64 – Blake, Age 13: Make friends with different interests

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 64 – Blake, Age 13: Make friends with different interests
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Think About it Questions
  • What interest or activity do you enjoy that has helped you (or could help you) make friends?
  • Why is pretending to be interested in something when you’re not a bad strategy for trying to make friends? (Hint: How might other kids react when they find out that you’re just pretending to be interested?)
  • Have you ever picked up a new interest or activity because a friend likes it? What happened?
  • If you want to pick up a new interest, why is it a good idea to try to learn about it a bit on your own, instead of just asking people about it?
  • What is the difference between being friendly versus being friends with someone?

Ep. 63 – Rosie, Age 5 3/4: Friend wants all her attention

Using “and” instead of “but” to expand beyond one friend. Rosie wonders why her friend doesn’t want her to play with anyone else, and what she can do about it.

Ep. 63 – Rosie, Age 5 3/4: Friend wants all her attention

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 63 – Rosie, Age 5 3/4: Friend wants all her attention
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Think About it Questions
  • Why do you think kids sometimes have trouble sharing a friend with other friends?
  • Have you ever been in a situation like Rosie’s, either as the friend who didn’t want to share a friend or the friend who wanted to play with other kids? What happened? How did you handle it?
  • Why is it a good idea to try to imagine why a friend might be doing what they’re doing, especially when we don’t like what they’re doing? (Hint: How are you likely to feel and act toward the friend when you can understand their perspective?)
  • Would you respond differently to hearing “I like you, AND I want to play with other friends” versus “I like you, BUT I want to play with other friends”? Why or why not?

Ep. 62 – All About Forgiveness

How to forgive friends who have hurt us.

Ep. 62 – All About Forgiveness

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 62 – All About Forgiveness
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Think About it Questions
  • Think of a time when you’ve forgiven someone for doing something that hurt or upset you. What happened? Why did you decide to forgive them?
  • Dr. Friendtastic said, “Holding onto bitterness and resentment hurts us more than anyone else.” What does that mean?
  • How is forgiving someone different than letting someone be mean to you? (Hint: It has to do with how you think about them and what you say to them.)
  • One of the forgiveness guidelines Dr. Friendtastic mentioned is: If it happened more than a month ago, definitely let it go! Do you agree with that guideline? Why or why not?
  • Why is it sometimes easier to forgive other people than to forgive ourselves?

Ep. 61 – Lucy, Age 6: How to fight less with brother

Getting along with sibling

Ep. 61 – Lucy, Age 6: How to fight less with brother

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 61 – Lucy, Age 6: How to fight less with brother
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Think About it Questions
  • Why do you think it’s sometimes harder for kids to get along with a sibling than a friend?
  • When a kid does something that annoys us, it’s tempting to do the same thing–or something worse–right back to them. Why is this usually not a good idea? (HINT: Why do both kids lose in a “contest” of who can be meanest?)
  • Dr. Friendtastic said “If you’ve asked a sibling [or other kid] to stop two times, and they haven’t listened, they’re probably not going to listen,” so your goal should shift “to taking care of yourself.” How could you do that?
  • Do you think it’s easiest to be an only child, an oldest sibling, a youngest sibling, or a middle sibling? Why?

Ep. 60 – Henry, Age 8: Friends invited but not him

Dealing with being excluded

Ep. 60 – Henry, Age 8: Friends invited but not him

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 60 – Henry, Age 8: Friends invited but not him
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Think About it Questions
  • Why do you think kids sometimes exclude other kids?
  • Have you ever felt excluded? What happened? How did you respond?
  • Why is it not a good idea to beg or bribe another kid to include you?
  • What do you think of the rule “You can’t say someone can’t play”? Are there any situations where it’s OK to exclude someone? What could you do if someone was wrecking the game, being too rough, or refusing to follow the rules? How could you handle it if lots of kids wanted to play a game that’s only for a few people
  • Being “the boss” can be fun and exciting. What could someone do to be a “good boss” or a true leader? (Hint: What could a leader do or not do to make the people who are getting directions feel good?)

Ep. 59 – Jessie, Age 13: Get rid of toxic friends

Dumping a friend or working things out by changing the dance?

Ep. 59 – Jessie, Age 13: Get rid of toxic friends

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 59 – Jessie, Age 13: Get rid of toxic friends
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Think About it Questions
  • Have you ever wanted to end a friendship? What happened?
  • In your own words, how would you explain this comment from Dr. Friendtastic? “I don’t believe people can be poison [toxic]. What I do believe is that sometimes people get into patterns of interacting that are hurtful for one or both of them.”
  • How is a friendship like an old-fashioned dance, where people hold onto each other? What are some ways you could change a friendship dance if you didn’t like what was happening?
  • Why is it not a good idea to suddenly stop talking to a friend, with no explanation?

Ep. 58 – Kenna, Age 7: Someone’s about to get hurt!

Safety first

Ep. 58 – Kenna, Age 7: Someone’s about to get hurt!

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 58 – Kenna, Age 7: Someone’s about to get hurt!
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Think About it Questions
  • Have you ever been in a situation where you thought a friend was in danger? What happened? How did you handle it?
  • What are some reasons why kids sometimes do things that are unsafe?
  • Safety is important, but sometimes kids can be too careful, meaning they don’t want to do things if there’s even a tiny possibility of danger or discomfort. What do you think would be an example of being too careful? How could being too careful be a problem?
  • Dr. Friendtastic says, “Preventing dangerous situations is usually easier than dealing with them after they’ve happened.” Do you agree? Why or why not?
  • Why might standing near a teacher or a group of friends be useful for preventing problems with someone who is acting too rough?

Ep. 57 – Zen, Age 6: Avoiding Conflict

The upside of disagreements

Ep. 57 – Zen, Age 6: Avoiding Conflict

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 57 – Zen, Age 6: Avoiding Conflict
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Think About it Questions
  • Describe a conflict you had with a friend. What happened? What was your friend’s point of view and what was yours? How did the conflict affect your friendship?
  • Dr. Friendtastic says that conflict can be a way for friends to learn about each other. What does that mean?
  • When might it be a good idea to give in and do what your friend wants, even though it isn’t exactly what you want? When is it NOT a good idea to do this?
  • Why is it important to try to understand what a friend is thinking or feeling? (Hint: What could happen if we just insist on what we want?)
  • What are some things you can do or not do to make conflicts with a friend less painful?

Ep. 56 – Diego, Age 11: Trouble making friends

Showing openness to friendship

Ep. 56 – Diego, Age 11: Trouble making friends

Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Kids Ask Dr. Friendtastic
Ep. 56 – Diego, Age 11: Trouble making friends
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Think About it Questions
  • Think of a time when you had to make new friends. What did you do? How did other kids respond?
  • Why does Dr. Friendtastic emphasize trying to make friends with kids who like to do the same things you like to do?
  • Why do you think some kids only want to be friends with the most popular kids? What are some possible problems with this approach to friendship?
  • What do you think it means to show that you’re open to friendship? What are some ways to do this? What actions would signal that you’re NOT open to friendship?
  • Why is it a good thing to invite someone to get together with you, even if they say no, they can’t because they’re busy? (Hint: What message do you give the other kid with your invitation?)

How to Submit YOUR Question About Friendship!

Kids, do you have a question you’d like Dr. Friendtastic to answer?

Ask your grown-up to use their smartphone's memo function or an audio app to record your question. Hold the phone close to your mouth to make sure the recording is clear. Say:

1) your first name (or a first name)

2) your age

3) a brief question or concern about friendship. (Please don’t mention any friends' names.)

Your grown-up can use this form or email the audio file to DrF@EileenKennedyMoore.com. Dr. Friendtastic will answer as many questions as possible. (If you have a very upsetting or emergency situation, please tell a trusted adult you know.)